The Mystery of Lawlessness

Will The AntiChrist Be Revealed on August 30th?

I recently saw and heard a message by a prominent TV Evangelist, who preached that the AntiChrist would be revealed on August 30, 2016 (today!).  Here is my response to his message:

In his Second Letter to the Church in Thessalonica, the Apostle Paul wrote about the conditions of lawlessness that would exist in the world prior to the second coming of our Lord Jesus Christ:

Now we request you, brethren, with regard to the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ and our gathering together to Him, that you not be quickly shaken from your composure or be disturbed either by a spirit or a message or a letter as if from us, to the effect that the day of the Lord has come. (II Thessalonians 2:1-2)

Evidently, the Thessalonians believed  that Jesus had already returned to claim his Church and that they had been left behind.

Paul explained in explicit terms, however, that they should not be so deceived in any way, for several events needed to take place before Christ’s actual return:

Let no one in any way deceive you, for it will not come unless the apostasy comes first, and the man of lawlessness is revealed, the son of destruction, who opposes and exalts himself above every so-called god or object of worship, so that he takes his seat in the temple of God, displaying himself as being God. (II Thessalonians 2:3-4)

Personally, I believe that many of the prophecies (see Matthew 24 and Mark 13) about the AntiChrist, Jerusalem’s being surrounded by armies, about earthquakes, the great tribulation, and the ensuing destruction of the Temple relate to the events in Jerusalem which occurred in 70 A.D., when Titus, the son of Emperor Vespasian, and the same Titus who eventually became the Emperor of Rome himself, invaded the city with his legions of Roman soldiers, killing many Jews and destroying the Second Temple built by King Herod.  It is believed that Titus did not want to destroy the Temple, but instead wanted to convert it into a Roman temple for the worship of Roman gods (see below). He wanted no rewards for his conquest of Jerusalem, claiming only to be an “instrument of god’s wrath” (Source).  

And while Titus himself tried to divert beliefs in his own deity, in spite of the political advantages, he was clearly complicit in the supposed “deification” of his father, Vespasian:

Vespasian’s curiosity in the rumours that the gods were on his side during his lifetime led to the action of his son and heir Titus to pursue immediate posthumous deification of Vespasian. Titus established a cult institution in the name of his father through the construction of the Temple of Vespasian near the Tabularium at Pompeii purely out of homage to his father and his efforts during his reign, a move devoid of political intentions but likely not devoid of political interpretation.

Despite a personal aversion to deification, appeals to godly ancestry and the apparent slew of omens following him throughout his lifetime, Vespasian utilised provincial interests in his divine right to rule to maintain loyalty to the imperial centre in his living years, and spent less than a year in mortal death before his successor placed his name among the deified Julio-Claudian emperors. (Source)

The Mystery of Lawlessness

Paul, however, wrote the following description of the events to come before the return of Christ, (I again am referring to Paul’s Second letter to the Thessalonians):

Do you not remember that while I was still with you, I was telling you these things? And you know what restrains him now, so that in his time he will be revealed. For the mystery of lawlessness is already at work; only he who now restrains will do so until he is taken out of the way. Then that lawless one will be revealed whom the Lord will slay with the breath of His mouth and bring to an end by the appearance of His coming; that is, the one whose coming is in accord with the activity of Satan, with all power and signs and false wonders, and with all the deception of wickedness for those who perish, because they did not receive the love of the truth so as to be saved. For this reason, God will send upon them a deluding influence so that they will believe what is false, in order that they all may be judged who did not believe the truth, but took pleasure in wickedness. (II Thessalonians 2:5-12)

While Titus himself sought to separate himself from claims of deity, he took direct action to ensure that his father, Emperor Vespasian, received divine recognition:

Vespasian’s curiosity in the rumours that the gods were on his side during his lifetime led to the action of his son and heir Titus to pursue immediate posthumous deification of Vespasian. Titus established a cult institution in the name of his father through the construction of the Temple of Vespasian near the Tabularium at Pompeii purely out of homage to his father and his efforts during his reign, a move devoid of political intentions but likely not devoid of political interpretation. (Source)

. . . .Vespasian was said to have possessed numen, which can be received by animals and inanimate objects, through Suetonius’ account of an ox which broke free of its yoke to burst into Vespasian’s dining room and bow its head at his feet, implying the process of freeing Rome from tyranny and submitting to a new welcome ruler. This sign of change heralded by supernatural events emerged frequently (during Vespasian’s rule. . . . Furthermore, Suetonius, however unreliably, also spoke of a stray dog which burst into Vespasian’s dining quarters and placed a severed hand at his feet, a sign to Roman society of divinity and inherent power. . . .In an attempt to maintain his auctoritas within the empire’s provinces, which Tacitus claimed he was lacking, Vespasian’s visit to Alexandria in AD 69 witnessed his public performance of miracles in apparent collaboration with the god Serapis to maintain provincial loyalty, healing two Alexandrians, one blind and one lame, despite his own doubt in his divine power. (Source)

Please note the references in this quotation to the “signs and wonders” attributed to Vespasian.  This description mirrors the one Paul writes about:  “One whose coming is in accord with the activity of Satan, with all power and signs and false wonders, and with all the deception of wickedness for those who perish”  (II Thessalonians 2:10-11). And Vespasian’s visit to Alexandria occurred in A.D. 69, just one year before his son’s military triumph in Jerusalem.

The Apostasy

Paul’s teaching is also clear for us today that the “Day of the Lord” has still not arrived, for a number of events have yet to happened.  Unless we are deluding ourselves, for example, the “apostasy” has not yet occurred, and even though many Christians seem to be losing their trust in God and falling away from the Faith, the Lord’s Church is still growing and increasing proportionally overall, even in countries like Cuba and China, or in Muslim countries, where Christianity is vehemently opposed.

The Apostle John had something specific to say about this question:

Children, it is the last hour; and just as you heard that antichrist is coming, even now many antichrists have appeared; from this we know that it is the last hour. They went out from us, but they were notreally of us; for if they had been of us, they would have remained with us; but they went out, so that it would be shown that they all are not of us.  (I John 2:18-19)

Nevertheless, Paul also wrote that “the mystery of lawlessness” is “already at work,” a condition that today seems just as prominent, and one that appears to be growing and increasing.  We need to discern what this “mystery of lawlessness” is, therefore, in order not to fall prey to deception ourselves.

What Is Lawlessness?

Paul provides a clue for understanding what the “mystery of lawlessness” is in verse 10 of II Thessalonians, Chapter 2:10-11:  Paul wrote that the “lawless one will be revealed,” who will appear with “all the deception of wickedness for those who perish, because they did not receive the love of the truth so as to be saved.”

We see from this description that resisting a “love of the truth” is what hinders people from being saved, a condition that leads to “lawlessness.”  In our world today, unfortunately, we are seeing an increasing trend towards lawlessness, which means also that people no longer have a love of the truth and are increasingly inclined to break the laws of the land.

My Experiences with Seeking The Truth

As a high school English teacher, and eventually a university English professor, I prepared with 12 years of college level education classes beyond high school.  My motive was not only to gain the knowledge and skills I needed to obtain a good teaching position, but also to learn about the world I lived in.  I survived any number of classes that I intuitively knew would not help me become an English teacher, such as Calculus and Chemistry, yet I still gained a level of wisdom, having experienced large portions of the world’s history and knowledge that was most likely beyond my reach intellectually. (I had to take an Introduction to Calculus class pass/fail, for example!)  

I can’t say that I loved some of the classes I took, but I loved learning, and I love learning to this day. In 1970, when I began my classes in higher education, I wanted to learn the truth about history, mathematics, philosophy, and music.  And in those days, it was believed that the truth could be discovered by uncovering facts and using sound logic.  

In the fall of 1972, when I began my classes in graduate education, I still wanted to learn the truth about history, mathematics, philosophy, and music.  And in those days, I still believed that the truth could be discovered by uncovering facts and using sound logic or using background information to judge an author’s intentions.  Imagine my surprise, however, when as a post-graduate student in my Master’s program I found that literature professors and experts no longer believed that the written word was definitive; they believed that it could never be deciphered and understood accurately with certainty.  

Imagine my surprise, however, when as a post-graduate student in my Master’s program I found that literature professors and other academic experts no longer believed that the written word was definitive; they believed that it could never be deciphered and understood accurately with certainty.  I was told that the words I was reading in a poem or story changed all the time, just because I was reading them!

I also discovered that even the facts of history were “open to interpretation,” and that the lessons of history were at that time subject to opinion and these opinions could even be revised for propaganda purposes.  I found that many arguments in favor of one political or strategic direction, for example, could be made on both sides of an argument, and people would feel satisfied that they had found the right answer or the correct direction to take.  It was commonly stated that “everyone has a right to his or her own opinion,” a belief that made everyone’s opinion equally valid since there was no way we could ultimately find the “truth” about any matter.  We all were supposed to believe like Pontius Pilate, who said, “What is truth?”  No longer was finding “absolute truth” possible. In academia, it all became a matter of “who makes the best case/argument.”

Today, conditions have devolved to the point where the truths of Scripture and the standards declared in the U.S. Constitution are no longer sufficient to reveal the truth about how we should live our lives. One reason Christians are so despised in today’s culture is that Christians believe that Jesus is “the Way, the Truth, and the Life,” and that the Scriptures reveal the truth about who we are and what our place is in this world.  Thus, we Christians are declared to be ignorant fools who believe in “fairy tales.”  And many of today’s political leaders no longer feel inclined to follow the strictures of the U.S. Constitution, in spite of their oaths to do so.  

If you want to see the lawlessness that commonly exists in our culture, a lawlessness that is based on the lack of a “love of the truth,” you have only to look at the many comments and replies to articles or posts on the internet.  Instead of sound logic or appeals to factual authority, arguments are most typically made using obscenities or name calling (ad hominem attacks, a logical fallacy indeed!).  

The Results of Lawlessness

I do not mean to imply that we need to become legalistic, seeking only to follow rules and regulations, for “We have been set free from the Law of sin and death”:

Therefore there is now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus. For the law of the Spirit of life in Christ Jesus has set you free from the law of sin and of death. For what the Law could not do, weak as it was through the flesh, God did: sending His own Son in the likeness of sinful flesh and as an offering for sin, He condemned sin in the flesh, (Romans 8:1-3).  

Paul’s message to us today is the same as the one he wrote so many years ago.  We must not be deceived by the “mystery of lawlessness.”

On the other hand, here are some of the consequences in today’s world of lawlessness and the refusal to seek after, and love, the Truth:

  • An increase in “wickedness.”  Believing and practicing what is evil or bad.
  • The increasing rejection and turning away from the Gospel of Jesus Christ in the educational and political realms, a refusal even to consider biblical claims.
  • A lack of respect for those in authority, whose job it is to enforce the laws of the land.
  • We have been influenced by a “deluding influence so that people believe what is false,” as Paul describes it in II Thessalonians 2:11.

Based on these conditions, I do not doubt that the “man of lawlessness” may soon be revealed for who he is.

However, Jesus was explicitly clear about these questions He replied to His disciples when they asked Him “When will these things be?” (Mark 13:4):

“But in those days, after that tribulation, the sun will be darkened and the moon will not give its light, and the stars will be falling from heaven, and the powers that are in the heavens will be shaken. Then they will see the Son of Man coming in clouds with great power and glory. And then He will send forth the angels, and will gather together His elect from the four winds, from the farthest end of the earth to the farthest end of heaven.

“But of that day or hour no one knows, not even the angels in heaven, nor the Son, but the Father alone.

“Take heed, keep on the alert; for you do not know when the appointed time will come. (Matthew 13:24-33).

Conclusion

I am nearly 70 years old, and I have yet to hear any predictions about the End Times, particularly those that include dates and years, that have come true.  As it is, the sun has now set on August 30th, and I have yet to learn exactly who the Antichrist is.

 

The Mystery of Pain

After enduring pain in my shoulder (rotator cuff) for several weeks, my orthopedic specialist gave me a cortisone shot. The shot was more than just a “pinch,” as shots are usually called by medical caregivers, but I was grateful afterwards, for I could move my shoulder again without feeling like I had been stabbed with an ice-pick!

This experience with pain was in addition to my craniotomy last fall and the onset of migraine headaches.  Physical pain is bad enough, but emotional and mental pain can be just as bad, if not more perplexing and burdensome.

Anyone who has chronic pain of one kind or another is usually moved to ask, “Why?  Why do I have pain in my life?”

Years ago, I learned some answers to these questions by studying the disease of leprosy that appears so often in the Bible.

Leprosy, or Hansen’s Disease, is an infection caused by bacteria that are contracted  by direct contact or through the air by sneezes or coughs.  Leprosy is highly contagious, therefore, which explains the prohibitions given to lepers in the Bible to prevent the spread of the disease.

(Click here to read Leviticus 13 for a description of the disease and its symptoms, along with some of the restrictions placed on lepers.)

Leprosy bacteria multiply slowly, so the disease may take years to fully manifest, but when it does, the symptoms are very visible, especially on the skin.  Here are some of the symptoms:

  • Skin lesions that may be faded/discolored
  • Growths on the skin
  • Thick, stiff or dry skin
  • Severe pain
  • Numbness on affected areas of the skin
  • Muscle weakness or paralysis (especially in the hands and feet)
  • Eye problems that may lead to blindness
  • Enlarged nerves (especially those around the elbow and knee)
  • A stuffy nose
  • Nosebleeds
  • Ulcers on the soles of feet

(Click to see source.)

What About Pain?

When leprosy becomes active, which may take two-three years after initial exposure, it eventually attacks the nervous system, leading to numbness in the nerves on the skin and the loss of feeling or sensation on the hands and feet.

Read a fuller description here:

Many have thought leprosy to be a disease of the skin. It is better classified, however, as a disease of the nervous system because the leprosy bacterium attacks the nerves. Leprosy’s agent M. leprae is a rod-shaped bacterium related to the tuberculosis bacterium. Leprosy is spread by multiple skin contacts, as well as by droplets from the upper respiratory tracts, such as nasal secretions that are transmitted from person to person.

Its symptoms start in the skin and peripheral nervous system (outside the brain and spinal cord), then spread to other parts, such as the hands, feet, face, and earlobes. Patients with leprosy experience disfigurement of the skin and bones, twisting of the limbs, and curling of the fingers to form the characteristic claw hand. Facial changes include thickening of the outer ear and collapsing of the nose. (Source)

The worst danger from the bacteria arises, therefore, when a burn or another kind of injury occurs, for example, and the leper does not feel the injury due to the lack of sensation at the site: “The leprosy bacillus destroys nerve endings that carry pain signals; therefore patients with advanced leprosy experience a total loss of physical pain. When these people cannot sense touch or pain, they tend to injure themselves or be unaware of injury caused by an outside agent” (Source).

Pain’s Purpose

Imagine putting your hand on a very hot iron or woodstove and not feeling anything.  You may end up leaving your hand on the heat for quite a while, resulting in a terrible burn.  If you had felt the pain initially, you would have quickly acted to remove your hand.

Consequently, as a result of an inability to feel pain, the leper does not react quickly, so the injury becomes quite severe, leading to extreme damage to the body.

Leprosy: A Metaphor for Sin

Leprosy was so dreaded that lepers were shunned, and they were required to announce their presence to others and were forbidden from touching anyone to prevent the spread of the disease:

As for the leper who has the infection, his clothes shall be torn, and the hair of his head shall be uncovered, and he shall cover his mustache and cry, ‘Unclean! Unclean!’ He shall remain unclean all the days during which he has the infection; he is unclean. He shall live alone; his dwelling shall be outside the camp. (Leviticus 13:45-46)

Leprosy was so dreaded, and the commandments of God were so clear, that lepers were shunned. Lepers were declared to be “unclean.” To prevent the spread of the disease, lepers were required to announce their presence to others and were forbidden even from touching anyone else.  Being shunned must have led to extraordinarily painful emotional distress, a switch from one kind of pain to another.

Incurable by man, many believed God inflicted the curse of leprosy upon people for the sins committed. In fact, those with leprosy were so despised and loathed that they were not allowed to live in any community with their own people (Numbers 5:2). Among the sixty-one defilements of ancient Jewish laws, leprosy was second only to a dead body in seriousness. A leper wasn’t allowed to come within six feet of any other human, including his own family. The disease was considered so revolting that the leper wasn’t permitted to come within 150 feet of anyone when the wind was blowing. Lepers lived in a community with other lepers until they either got better or died. This was the only way the people knew to contain the spread of the contagious forms of leprosy. (Source)

Being shunned must have led to extraordinarily painful emotional distress, a switch from one kind of pain to another. The consequences of leprosy, therefore, are analogous to the consequences of sin.  When we are infected with sin in our lives, we become “unclean,” and our sin may even infect others with serious consequences.  Sin results in severe consequences in our lives, both physically and mentally.  Like leprosy, these consequences may take years to yield their results in mental distress and physical deformities.

Like the symptoms of leprosy, the consequences of sin in our lives may take years to yield their results in mental distress and physical deformities.  Yet, we should dread the symptoms of sin even more than those of leprosy, for the consequences of sin are death and eternal separation from God.

Jesus Cleanses the Leper

Jesus Christ, however, is the answer for both leprosy and sin, along with the resulting mental and physical deformities and anguish:

When Jesus came down from the mountain, large crowds followed Him. And a leper came to Him and bowed down before Him, and said, “Lord, if You are willing, You can make me clean.” Jesus stretched out His hand and touched him, saying, “I am willing; be cleansed.” And immediately his leprosy was cleansed. And Jesus said to him, “See that you tell no one; but go, show yourself to the priest and present the offering that Moses commanded, as a testimony to them.” (Matthew 8:1-4)

Jesus is willing to cleanse us wholly, in spirit, soul, and body.  He renews a right spirit within us and restores our souls.  Like King David, we may pray the following prayer in faith:

Hide Your face from my sins
And blot out all my iniquities.

Create in me a clean heart, O God,
And renew a steadfast spirit within me.
Do not cast me away from Your presence
And do not take Your Holy Spirit from me. (Psalms 51:9-11)

Jesus Himself, because of His love for us, is the One who restores our souls and cleanses us from all the consequences of sin.  See what the Apostle Peter wrote about the crucifixion of Christ:

And while being reviled, He did not revile in return; while suffering, He uttered no threats, but kept entrusting Himself to Him who judges righteously; and He Himself bore our sins in His body on the cross, so that we might die to sin and live to righteousness; for by His wounds you were healed. For you were continually straying like sheep, but now you have returned to the Shepherd and Guardian of your souls. (I Peter 2:23-25)

While on the cross and before His ascension into Heaven, therefore, Jesus became our substitute, taking our sins upon Himself and cleansing us from all unrighteousness if we will only accept Him.  By faith (which is the “assurance of things hoped for, the conviction of things not seen” Hebrews 11:1), we may receive His ultimate cleansing in spirit, soul, and body, taking away our pain.

Today, we constantly seek ways to escape our pain, whether through cortisone shots, or pills, or certain “relaxation techniques” that are essentially occultic.  While we do not like the experience of pain in our lives, we should seek the causes of our pain and be thankful to a wise and loving God who gave us nerves that help us feel the pain of dangerous situations, thereby protecting us from further harm and disabilities.  And above all, we need to find our answer to pain in the forgiveness provided  by God and the salvation offered through the sacrifice of His Son, the Lamb of God who takes away the sin of the world.

 

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